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What To Do In Singapore: Vintage Camera Museum

As Singaporeans, we love to complain that there is nowhere to go and nothing to see in Singapore. So, while searching what to do and finding deals on Fave, I stumbled upon the Vintage Camera Museum. I did a bit of quick research and found that the building itself is camera shaped and it housed a bunch of vintage cameras. The bf and I were super bored and craving to go out, so that's where we headed to.

Cost
Admission to the museum is $8 for a weekday entry and $10 for a weekend entry on the Fave app. If you don't have an account yet, you can sign up and use my code HYFWQ at checkout for $2 off.

Location:
8C, 8D Jalan Kledek
Singapore 199264

The museum is located about 10 mins walk away from Jalan Besar station or 15 mins away from Bugis station. If you have a bus to Stamford Primary School, that would drop you off right across the museum.

We walked from Jalan Besar MRT and the route was safe, scenic and pleasant.

The Museum
The museum itself is hard to miss because it is a very white camera-shaped building. I can't remember if it won the Guinness World Record but it is recorded to be the biggest camera-shaped building in the world.
There is some parking space in front of the museum so if it is filled with cars, you might have trouble getting a good photo of the entire building without getting blocked. There are also a couple of vintage camera statues on the patio.

Once you are ready to enter, head up the flight of stairs into the eye of the camera.

The inside of the museum is actually pretty small and I was a little disappointed because of that. At first glance, it seems to be the kind of place where you would spend a maximum of 30 minutes at. So, considering the price of the tickets and the amount of time you're going to spend there, that could be a deterrence. Taking pictures outdoors is completely free though.

BUT, if you are a camera-phile and you are there for the cameras, you will enjoy the museum. There are hundreds of vintage film cameras for you to admire.

There are a couple of interactive displays for you to play with and history to read up on as well. There is an exhibit of the world's tiniest camera and the world's biggest camera too so that is pretty interesting.
The bulk of the cameras are locked behind a glass display so you can only look at them but if you head towards the counter, there are some cameras and flash bars which you can pick up and play with. Most of them still work in the sense that you can "roll" the film and click the shutter.
The lady-in-charge that day said that most of the cameras in the museum were donated to the museum. It's really impressive because some of these cameras are decades old.

There is a room next door filled with fun photo opportunities with famous people like Charlie Chaplin and the Mona Lisa.
The museum was really quiet and empty when we went. In fact, we were the only guests so we had all the room and time to ourselves.

In the end, we did spend about half an hour at the museum but there were a reasonable amount of things to see. I do appreciate the aesthetic of vintage cameras and my boyfriend took the opportunity to snap some photos to practice his photography (all in an air-conditioned room).

Afterwards, we went to Swee Choon Dim Sum Restaurant for dinner because it's in the area and we were pretty early so we didn't have to wait in line. It's a really popular place so you could consider as well.

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